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Archive for the ‘Excursions’ Category

Without photos this post will seem woefully incomplete but I promise to add them as soon as I have a funcional computer back in the states!

This past weekend I went with two friends to Marrakesh, Morocco–a trip unlike any other I´d experienced.  My travel companions were my friend Caroline, a girl in my program, and a friend of hers from class, Eirini, who is from Athens (Greece not Georgia) and is studying Spanish in Barca for the semester after having already completed her bachelor´s and master´s in England.  At first I (and my parents, I´m sure) was hesitant about not having a male traveling with us (after having some organizational mishaps in which the original guy who was going on our trip had to back out), but suprisingly the trip was smooth without any major problems pertaining to our sex.

We flew from Barcelona to Casablanca on Saturday (a short 2 hour flight) and upon immediately getting off the plane, my senses pricked up and I took note of my different surroundings.  For although Morocco is considered one of the most modern and westernized countries in the Muslim world, there were still no shortages of burqas, hijabs, and traditional dress.  We were so lucky to have Eirini with us for we learned she spoke French–a real necessity as it turned out.  She bargained beautifully with our cab driver at the airport to take us to the train station (where we would take a train from Casablanca to Marrakesh).  Starving, we tried to find food but the train station was literally in the middle of nowhere so we found a dilapidated corner store and bought Moroccan potato chips and butter cookies.  At this point I was still on my guard, unadjusted to my new surroundings and I was afraid that we really stood out with our fair skin, light hair, and Western dress.  But no one made any comments to us and we had an easy train ride, riding first class for the equivalent of only €14!  Once we arrived in Marrakesh, the owners of our hotel arranged for us to have a pick up and thank goodness we did because it was one less thing to worry about.  Arriving after dark, I marveled at the sights of Marrakesh, including the crazy drivers who seemed neither to obey traffic laws nor use traffic signals, with cars darting in front of one another, cutting each other off as motorbikes whizzed by, narrowly avoiding nicking another car.  We stayed in a lovely Riad, Riad Miski, owned by a French ex-pat couple, Francis and Christine.  Once the van arrived, we got off in a little square where people were milling about, men were pulling carts with donkeys, and children were running around.  The driver helped escort us to the Riad, which consisted of walking down a dark, narrow, and very spooky street in the Medina (or old walled city).  Thankfully I´d been tipped off by guidebooks not to get alarmed as most riads were just as hidden and hard to find as ours.  Once we arrived at the riad and met the owners, we noticed how beautiful and charming it was and how it opened up into a central courtyard with a terrace on top.  Our suite was lovely and had some traditionally Moroccan elements.  Tired, we were thankful that they had prepared a dinner for us.  After telling me that the chef had already left but “we´ll see what we can do” I was shocked at the wonderful meal we had before us: mint tea, eggplant spread, sweetly-seasoned tomato spread, salad, Moroccan pita-type bread, chicken tagine (a Moroccan stew), and a crispy bread dessert with a sweet dairy or cheese on top followed by dates and more tea!  Everyone was so welcoming and, true to form, the Middle Eastern hospitality was in full force.

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After breakfasting on the terrace, Christine escorted us to the main plaza, the Jemaa al Fna, which during the day is home to acrobats, henna artists, snake charmers (yes, real snake charmers), spice sellers, and juice vendors.  At night it becomes a crazy scene with loads of food stalls and other entertainment in addition to that during the day.  She also took us around the crazy labyrinth of the souk or bazaar, where you could find everything from scarves, lamps, hookahs, spices, jewelry, rugs, leatherware, and other decorations.  She took us to some vendors she knew who gave us a good price for spices and scarves.  She then left us to go meet some arriving guests and the three of us girls were on our own.  Though it was not high tourist season, there was a significant presence of tourists, which meant that we were not accosted too much.  The vendors were not too aggressive and a simple “no merci” usually did the trick.  As three unaccompanied girls, we surprisingly never felt too unsafe nor uncomfortable.  After leaving the souk, we visited an old (but no longer operational) madrassa, or Islamic school that instructed young boys in Islam and the Coran.  It was a beautiful old building with lots of small rooms where you could picture the boys hunched over reciting coranic verses.  Next we saw the Koutoubia Mosque, though non-muslims are not allowed to enter inside (I don´t know why…some mosques permit other faiths to go in).  Afterwards we visited the stunning and recently re-opened La Mamounia hotel for a cup of tea (that´s all we could afford), which I believe is owned by the Moroccan royal family.  This hotel was majorly luxurious and also very westernized as there were women lounging poolside in bikinis and couples drinking alcohol.  Next we indulged ourselves and took a horse-drawn carriage ride around the city, stopping at the Majorelle Gardens which have plants from 5 continents and are now financed by the Yves St. Laurent Estate (who knew?)

Afterwards we bargained some more in the souk before having a dinner of tagine and cous-cous at a restaurant overlooking the Jemma al Fna.

*

The next morning Christine had kindly arranged for us to take a day trip to the Marrakeshi desert and we met our guide, Frederic, in front of the KFC (ha).  Like Francis and Christine, Frederic was also a French ex-pat who decided to move his whole family from Paris to Marrakesh.  After buying a riad and some horses, he was horseback riding in the desert one evening when he discovered a real, nature-made oasis.  After tracking down the owner, he bought the property and has developed it (minimally), christening it Le Pause.  He has made rustic-chic villas (beautiful and traditional furniture with minimal electricity but modern plumbing)  and luxury tents for guests to both dine in and sleep in. After exploring the property, we got to ride some camels!  Funny creatures.  The most exciting part of the camel ride was when they stand up or sit down for you to mount on or off as their spindly legs cause a little jolt.  After our camel trek we had another great Moroccan meal of more eggplant, tomato, and carrot spreads with warm bread, lamb tagine, and a chocolate cake for dessert.

We left Le Pause as the sun set in the desert, to return to the bustling city.  We had to leave the great Riad Miski as they didn´t have rooms available that night and we went to another riad nearby, Riad Puchka, which was quite an adventure.  It was more traditional-looking than the other (which was cool, I suppose) but did not seem as nice.  The owners are actually Americans but seem to have minimal involvement.  We had some communication problems with the guy staffing the place but then decided (after Eirini desperately tried to communicate with him in her perfect French) that he was high on hash.  Luckily the place was fine and safe, so after our big lunch we just tuckered down and ´feasted´on peanut butter sandwiches (which I had schlepped from Barca via Chicago) and clementines.

*

The next day we spent an onerous 12 hours traveling back to Barcelona, first taking another train from Marrakesh to Casablanca and then another from the train station to the airport before getting on our plane.  Finally home, I was exhausted but had to cram for my final in History of Islam (how appropriate!) which luckily is over and done with.

It´s incredible that I only have two weeks left in this great city.  I´m filled with such mixed emotions–both excited to be coming home and sad to leave…

At last!  Photos!

Our Riad, the lovely Riad Miski

The souk

Spices

Lanterns in the Souk

The courtyard of the old Madrassa

My friend in front of an arch in the Madrassa

A view from their reflecting pool

Outside the luxurious La Mamounia Hotel

The Koutoubia Mosque

The Berber-style tent we ate lunch in at Le Pause Oasis

Camel riding

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As an addendum to my last post, my beloved dinosaur of a computer has finally died and I will have to replace it in Chicago.  What that means for the future of urbanita is simply this: fewer posts and unfortunately no photos (in all likelihood).  That said, I want to fill you in on the last few weeks and promise to add photos once I´m back in the States.

Ruta de Dalí

A few weekends ago, CASB (my program) took another group trip up to the Costa Brava (home of beautiful beaches, El Bulli, and the Dalí museum).  We stayed in Roses for two nights, during which we took trips during the day to discover “the route of Dalí.”  On Saturday we made it to Dalí´s crazy hallucinatory house that he shared with his wife, Gala, in Port Lligat.  It was home to his studio and many assorted surrealist furniture pieces.  Then it was on to Cadaques, a beautiful beach town, for a great lunch with an even better pastry and cappuccino break before heading to the Dalí Museum in Figueres. I´m sorry I can´t post photos right now, but this place was truly head-spinningly cool.  The building itself had a huge courtyard with sculptures on the stone wall and massive paintings.  Inside, the museum held many a Dalí masterpiece filled with all sorts of crazy Dalí symbols, fetishes, dreams, nightmares, sexual references…

Our last stop on Sunday was the castle Dalí bought for Gala (during a period in which they were living apart) in Pubol. It was interesting, though with limited time, I´d definitely recommend skipping it in favor of the museum.  Other highlights from the weekend including going out in Roses as one massive CASB group (and getting to hang out with people you don´t normally see in the process) and seeing a bizarre hip-hop performance by a female Spanish dance team in one of the plazas in Figueres.

Thanksgiving in Barcelona?

After returning to Barcelona, I connected with my family who had flown in for the week to see me and have Thanksgiving.  It was great having them here and getting to show them my new city and rediscovering it for myself in the process.  We visited Parc Güell, walked around in the Barri Gotic (and saw the oldest synagogue in Spain, in the Call).  We gourged on rosé and tapas, including a fabulous set of tapas meals at Cervesaría Catalana and Taller de Tapas.  My dad and brother went to the FC Barca-Inter Milan game (Barca won 2-0!) while my mom and I had drinks at the chic Hotel Arts down by the beach.  Went to the Miró Foundation (one of the best museums in Barcelona) and saw the view from atop Mt. Tibidabo.  We tried some of Barcelona´s famed gastronomic cuisine at Comerç 24 (the chef, Carlos Abellan is a disciple of Ferran Adria´s, the chef/owner of El Bulli) and had argentine steak for Thanksgiving!  Finally, we rounded off their visit with a day trip to Girona, a charming city (around the size of Providence with a populaton of 120,000) with a beautiful medieval section including a huge Cathedral and pretty Call or Jewish quarter.

That´s what I´ve been up to in addition to studying this week (who knew that I´d have to study in Spain! haha)  I was mildly terrified for an oral interview  all in Spanish about a book with my History of Islam Professor (who I have trouble understanding his accent to boot) but it went better than expected and he turned out to be a nice guy (not nearly so intimidating as he is in class).  This Saturday I´m off on another adventure to Morocco with some friends!  It´s been a nightmare planning this trip (with drop-outs and new flights) but now that it´s finally coming together I can´t wait!  It´s somewhere I´ve always dreamed of traveling to, and I´m so excited to be taking advantage of my proximity to Morocco while I´m here.

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Tonight I just got back from my first FC Barcelona game against Zaragoza (another team from a town in Spain) at the massive Camp Nou stadium (it seats 80,000 people and is one of the biggest, if not the biggest stadium in Europe).  

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It was a rout: Barça’s 6 to Zaragoza’s 1.  It was definitely a highlight of my time here thus far being at the game amongst 75,000 other screaming, delirious fans.  And I do enjoy watching professional soccer– you get sort of mesmerized by the way the players pass and handle the ball and then boom! Someone gets a breakaway and scores a goal and then you’re up off your feet screaming with everyone else.


Here were some highlights and funny observations from the game:

-Only non-alcoholic beer is sold at the games because of past problems with drunk, rowdy soccer hooligans

-Furthermore, you knew that this was pure 100% Catalan territory because all concession stand signs were bilingual in Catalan and English with no Castillian (regular old Spanish) to be found in sight

-The entire stadium did 3-4 rounds of the wave

-Though there were over 75,000 fans at the game, I happened to be sitting about 30 feet across the aisle from a friend I knew back in Chicago who is also studying abroad here

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Londres

This past weekend I was lucky enough to hop up to London and see my Dad, who was there on business.  With no classes on Monday (it was a bank holiday in Barcelona), I arrived on Saturday and stayed ’til Tuesday morning.


Except for my 8-hour blitz at the start of this journey, I had never been to London or as the Spaniards call it, Londres, or as Kanye (he of the “Im’ma let you finish Taylor, but Beyonce had the best video of ALL TIME!) calls it, Londontown. Despite the nippy weather, I felt a sense of comfort being over there.  And, yes, that probably had something to do with the shared language and the fact that I was with my Dad, but I immediately took a liking to it.  Unfortunately after spending the interminable amount of time amongst the two airbuses-worth of people coming in from Lahore at Customs, I didn’t make it to the hotel until early evening, so I had to scrap my original plan to go to Harrod’s (yes, woe is me).  Dad and I had a great English dinner at a very pretty,  traditional-looking (re: oak-paneling, pianist in the corner, waiters in jackets and ties) restaurant, Simpsons-in-the-Strand.  We had some good English roast beef that came with Yorkshire Pudding, Savoy cabbage, and roast potatoes.  We had an amazing sampler of desserts later on, including “treacle pudding,” which is a sponge cake with a tasty carmelized sugar sauce on top.  

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The next day we went on one of those super-touristy hop-on/hop-off bus tours, but it was a good way to see the city.  Our tour guide was nice and had a penchant for cars (that’s actually an understatement…he was obsessed!  He’d point out all of the luxury car dealerships…”Look to the right, it’s the Bentley dealership!”).  We decided that we’d stay for the entire tour and then get back on later and actually get off and explore.  After the tour, we went to the Brown’s Hotel for a lovely English tea, replete with the requisite scones, clotted cream, and strawberry preserves, tea sandwiches (my favorite!) and pastries.  I left thoroughly stuffed…especially after they kept refilling our plates of scones and sandwiches after we’d finish with them.

Then we ambled our way along the Thames to try and see Parliament, Big Ben, and Westminster Abbey.  Unfortunately as it was a Sunday, Westminster Abbey was closed to tourists (though they did have Sunday services) as was Parliament.  We did see several Green Peace-ers had managed to climb up to the Parliament roof protesting, I suppose, inaction by Parliament towards the environment.  Then Dad and I had the genius idea that we’d walk to the Tower of London (which we knew was open)…it took a long, long time.  Really long.  It actually was a pleasant walk except for the fact that Dad was exhausted from jetlag and we arrived at the Tower at 5:01 when the last admission was at 5:00.  We were one minute late.  And we could not buy a damn ticket.  So, I took a photo of a Beefeater (see below) and we called it a day.

***

On my last day in London I was on my own as Dad had a business meeting. My original hope was that I’d have seen all of the touristy things the day before and then use my final day to wander around cool neighborhoods and try to explore more ‘local flavor’ as they say.  That didn’t happen seeing as I wasn’t able to go inside many of the Big Things the day before.  So, like a madwoman, I dashed around the city from 9 am until 8 pm, with only a 20 min stop for lunch.  Here’s what I managed:

-Went to Westminster Abbey when it opened and after trying in vain to find the plaque of a distant ancestor (or so we think) buried there, Lord Edward Bulwer Lytton (he who coined the phrase “’twas a dark and stormy night”) in Poet’s Corner, I stumbled upon it (fate!) just as I was about to leave

-Saw the changing of the guards at Buckingham Palace

-Finally (!) made it to see the tower…saw the Crown Jewels but found the old archival video footage of Queen Elizabeth II’s coronation more interesting

-Went to the Tate and saw an interesting (and at-times X-rated) pop art exhibit with works by Andy Warhol (including funny Andy Warhol TV videos from the ’80s as well as his guest appearances on Love Boat!), Damien Hirst, Keith Haring and Jeffrey Koons among others

-Walked around Notting Hill for a bit

-Made it to Harrod’s and had a coconut cupcake in their Food Emporium

After my blitz, Dad and I had a delicious Indian dinner at a restaurant called Gaylord India (there are so many Indian restaurants with that name!).  As much as I do love Spanish tapas, I had been craving some good ethnic food so Indian really hit the spot (and the Brits aren’t know for having a standout local gastronomy anyway)…

Then to cap my last night I had G&Ts with Jackie (my friend who lives in London and whom I saw at the start of all this craziness) and traded stories about living overseas.  

It was a great trip, and I felt like I didn’t nearly scratch the surface of all that London has to offer, so I hope to go back sometime soon!

Pictures below

 

Parliament, Big Ben and the Thames

Parliament, Big Ben and the Thames

St. Paul's Cathedral

St. Paul's Cathedral

 

St. Jame's Palace and the Union Jack

St. Jame's Palace and the Union Jack

A Bobby! Checking his cellphone!

A Bobby! Checking his cellphone!

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The Tower Bridge

The Tower Bridge

The Tower of London...it's looks so pleasant to have been the sight of many a beheading!

The Tower of London...it's looks too pleasant to have been the sight of many a beheading!

A Beefeater (or "yeoman of the guard" as I learned they're actually known)

A Beefeater (or "yeoman of the guard" as I learned they're actually known)

The London Eye

The London Eye

Westminster Abbey...home to my ancestor, Lord Lytton :)

Westminster Abbey...home to my ancestor, Lord Lytton 🙂

Buckingham Palace

Buckingham Palace

The Changing of the Guard

The Changing of the Guard

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Los Pireneos

This past weekend the entire CASB (or consooorrrtium) group took a trip to the Pyrenees to see…Romanesque churches!!!  In all seriousness, the scenery was breath-taking and some of what we learned about the romanesque (or románico in español) art and architecture was interesting (particularly the bit about the religious iconography used to signify which apostles were which since most people were illiterate).  We arrived in the Valle de Boi on Friday evening, and our drive there was one of the most stunning I’ve ever seen.  It had been raining and so the entire mountain range was covered in a dark, haunting fog (ok, I gotta make a Harry Potter reference so you can understand the visuals…) that shimmered over the lakes in the valleys.  Unfortunately I don’t have any photos of this because it was too dark and misty for them to turn out.


We spent the next day touring the Romanesque churches, which are tiny stone churches (unlike the big Gothic cathedrals) dating back to the 11-13th centuries.  The first church we visited, I believe it was called San Climente de Taüll, was very pretty with a tall bell tower.

The belltower of San Climente de Taüll

The belltower of San Climente de Taüll

Insided we saw the Romanesque artwork (most of which were reproductions as the originals have miraculously been transported to the Museo Nacional de Cataluña or MNAC).

Jesus with an alpha and omega in the background meant to signify his power "from beginning to end"

Jesus with an alpha and omega in the background meant to signify his power "from beginning to end"

I got to go up the belltower and guess what I saw?

A shepherd herding his flock down the street!

A shepherd herding his flock down the street!

(I’ll try to post the video I took so you can hear their bells ringing but I’m technologically illiterate, practically).


Here are some more photos of the region:

Who knew parts of Spain could conjure up images of Heidi in the Swiss Alps?

Who knew parts of Spain could conjure up images of Heidi in the Swiss Alps?

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A courtyard in one of the cathedrals

A courtyard in the one cathedral we visited


After several Romanesque churches, it was time for lunch.  Our program director, Juanjo, graciously gave us 5 hours of free time in “the largest town in the area with nightlife.”  It was an epic fail, but well-intentioned.  Here’s why: A) The sleepy town had very few stores or restaurants opened when we arrived at 2 pm because it was siesta time     B) My friends and I unwittingly went into a pizzeria that was not serving pizza and had an awful lunch  C) There was no semblance of nightlife and why would we want to take advantage of said-nightlife at 3 in the afternoon?  D) There was a small protest against a broken promise that the government had made to provide this town with a better highway, so our departure was delayed


So…a few friends and I basically played cards all afternoon and walked around the grocery store.

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The next day we visited a castle on our way home, but the only disappointing thing was that you couldn’t see too much of the grounds because they’d been turned into a hotel.

The Castle in Cardona

The Castle in Cardona

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The Catalan flag is in the background

The Catalan flag is in the background

Verdict on the Pyrenees:  breathtaking scenery, pretty churches, don’t go for the nightlife (as we evidently learned while leaving our hotel the last morning…)

This weekend is the Mercé, one of the biggest festivals of the year in Barcelona, which means a 4-day weekend filled with fire, human towers, gigantic paper-machine creatures, and fire works!!

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This past weekend, I went with 16 (!) other kids in my program up to the Costa Brava, just north of Barcelona, to a town called Tossa de Mar.  It was our first long weekend as that Friday was the Dia de la Constitución, a regional holiday for Catalunya commemorating, actually, the loss of Catalunya’s regional independence to Spain.  So back home we celebrate gaining our independence and Catalans celebrate losing it…huh.  But it meant that we didn’t have classes this Friday (*note: none of the Spanish universities have started classes yet (!), instead we are finishing  three-week long, intensive orientation classes…)

We spent the three days on a “vacation from our vacation,” lounging on the beach, scarfing lots of tapas, and drinking pitchers of sangria in many iterations (red wine sangria, white wine sangria, sangria de cava…).  Here are some shots of Tossa (unfortunately my camera ran out of battery so all photos are credited to my friend, Kinneri):

 

This is where we were!

This is where we were!

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By far one of the best discoveries was this tiny restaurant up in the old medieval section of the town called La Lluna.  This charming tapas joint churned out one mouth-watering dish after the other.  The first night I went with two hungry guys and the three of us collectively ordered the following: an order of patatas bravas (a Spanish specialty of fried potatoes with a spicy aioli sauce), Catalan sausage called butifarra, toasted bread with sopressata sausage and brie cheese, a sampling of Spanish cheeses (think nutty Manchego), meatballs, pan con tomate (sort of like bruschetta but the Spanish version rubs the olive oil and tomatoes over bread and then pitches the rest of the tomato, so all you have are its juice and seeds) and…the winning dish of chorizo in a sublime cider sauce.  You would’ve thought we were at least six people, not three…but hey, tapas are small plates, right?  

After sleeping late in our fortress-like/budget, European-style Poconos hotel (a separate post dedicated to our dear hotel, the San Eloy, to follow), we spent the next day at the beach after exploring some of the medieval fortress and old city (we just exchanged one fortress for the other).  


The Medieval tower atop the fortress.  *Note the presence of the Catalan, NOT the Spanish, flag!

The Medieval tower atop the fortress. *Note the presence of the Catalan, NOT the Spanish, flag!

 

 

That night, a slightly larger group returned to La Lluna for another banquet of a meal.  After checking out the town’s nightlife (namely the one busy nightclub), a group spontaneously went skinny dipping (you’ll have to guess whether your blogger partook or not).


On our final day, we awoke to overcast skies as we checked out of the San Eloy, which later worked to our advantage as we were able to secure spots on one of the smaller beaches that opened onto a pretty cove.

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Pretty soon the sun came out, and tanning commenced once more.  By far the biggest highlight of the weekend soon followed as some of us bravely went cliff-jumping at the recommendation of one of our fearless friends, Danny.  After testing the waters, so-to-speak, by jumping off a small cliff, we watched as Danny gamely took the plunge (wow, these puns are really easy–I think that’s two…have you been counting?) and jumped off a cliff that we later estimated was 25-30 ft. high.  After attesting that the waters were deep enough, nearly the entire group decided to try it for themselves, including yours truly, and it was exhilarating! It was such a strange feeling to have some sense of awareness while you’re falling down from such a height.  Though I did not enter the water gracefully, and I got a lot of saltwater up my nose and in my mouth, it was thoroughly worth it.  After that adventure, we treated ourselves to lunch and gelato before finally leaving Tossa and returning back to Barcelona, our new home.

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La Sagrada Familia

Last weekend I visited the famous Sagrada Familia, one of Gaudí’s most notable works, with my roommate, Tanja.  Without this turning into a history lesson, the Sagrada Familia is a massive church whose construction began in 1882 from private funding and continues to this day! That’s right.  It’s been 127 years and it’s still not finished!  Designed by Antoni Gaudí, he of “Modernista Architecture” fame, this colossal structure is bold, awe-inspiring, and confusing all at the same time.  It combines religious themes (it is a church after all) with references to nature, the human body, and even the instability and revolts of the 1920s (pre-Spanish Civil War).  Gaudí even threw himself in there, too.  And it happens to be walking-distance from my residencia.

But my words cannot do it justice, so instead here are some pictures:

 

This is what you see as you approach-note the presence of construction!

This is what you see as you approach-note the presence of construction!

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A cool shot of the towers and the back façade, which depicts Christ's crucifixion

 

A closer look at one of the images on the façade: the Romans about to crucify Christ with his Apostles in the background--the apostle on the far left has been given Gaudí's face

A closer look at one of the images on the façade: the Romans about to crucify Christ with his Apostles in the background--the Apostle on the far left has been given Gaudí's face

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The inside of the church with its beautiful stained glass.  Unfortunately, the bulk of the inside is still under construction.

The inside of the church with its beautiful stained glass. Unfortunately, the bulk of the inside is still under construction.

 

The inside columns are meant to resemble trees topped with palm fronds

The inside columns are meant to resemble trees topped with palm fronds

 

This craziness is the back façade depicting Christ's birth--it's meant to contrast with the start and somber front façade

This craziness is the back façade depicting Christ's birth--it's meant to contrast with the start and somber front façade

 

A close up...Gaudí loved nature themes

A close up

 

This is, I believe, a sculpture in the inside depicting the biblical temptation of man but meant to resemble a 1920s Spanish anarchist holding a grenade

This is, I believe, a sculpture in the inside depicting the biblical temptation of man but meant to resemble a 1920s Spanish anarchist holding a grenade

 

The whimsical tops of the towers all made of mosaics

The whimsical tops of the towers all made of mosaics

So there you have it.  My roommate and I spent 2 hours wandering around the Sagrada and I still feel like there is so much more to see!

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